Here's why your beer glass is shaped that way | HopCat

Here's why your beer glass is shaped that way

By Troy Reimink, BarFly/HopCat Webmaster
Thursday, October 26, 2017
Glasses

If you’re a relative newcomer to craft beer, you might have wondered why some kinds of beers come in “normal”-looking pint glasses, and others are…different. Snifters. Tulips. Mini snifters. Flutes. Vases. And so forth.

 Our beer menus contain an infographic which type of beer is served in each different glass. But our servers will occasionally get confused looks when a sour or extra-hoppy beer is delivered in a tulip.  We’re not passing judgement on you in any sense by implying that you should drink out of a fancy-looking chalice or goblet. It’s just that not every beer belongs in the same container. 

The knowledgeable people at CraftBeer.com have put together a set of graphics that offer a useful primer in glassware for the craft beer drinker. [Click here to read.]

A few takeaways: 

- The shape of the glass is important for the containment of foam and concentration of the various aromas and flavors that vary by the style of beer.

- Ideally, the only craft beer you should be drinking out of a “regular” pint glass – a.k.a. a Nonic pint – is something dark (a stout or porter) or something bitter and hoppy (pale ale or IPA).

- The tulip is great anything tart, sour, hoppy or fruity – it signals a bold flavor, pretty much.

- If your glass is cold, something is wrong. Beer glasses of any shape should be stored at room temperature. Anything colder will negatively impact the flavor – no matter what the bartender pulling mass-produced beer into a frosted mug tells you.